Tag Archives: Secularism

Friday Phraseology: Secularism


Secularism: A belief system, attitude or style of life that denies or ignores the reality of God. Derived from a term that means “worldly,” secularism (and its articulate philosophical expression, secular humanism) focuses on the natural order of things as the only reality. Increasingly, however, secularism can be viewed as an attitude that even affects people who claim to believe in God and the supernatural. Much in modern culture pressures people to live in such a way that God is marginal and insignificant to their daily existence. See also humanism.


 

Evans, C. Stephen (2010-03-17). Pocket Dictionary of Apologetics & Philosophy of Religion: 300 Terms & Thinkers Clearly & Concisely Defined (The IVP Pocket Reference Series) (Kindle Locations 1587-1591). InterVarsity Press. Kindle Edition.

Sunday Terminology: Secular Humanism


Secular Humanism: According to WebWord Dictionary, “it is the doctrine emphasizing a person’s capacity for self-realization through reason; rejects religion and the supernatural.” It is a secular philosophy in atheistic nature which embraces human reason over any religions or faith system. It disapproves distinctively any religious dogma, supernaturalism, pseudoscience or superstitions as the basis of morality and decision-making, since it posits human rationality as the highest value which is the source of value without any reference to concept of the supernatural.

 

Gen-X Apologetics


Journal Article Review on Gen-X Apologetics by David Neff

In his essay, “Gen-X Apologetics,” David Neff presents three different apologias from three different books. As the adolescents of this generation are highly influenced by rapid social change, global village concept, cultures, and customs, they have undervalued the meaning and purpose of life. Children in their juvenile are highly shaped by their contemporary cohort and culture than intimate family. And they have lost their hope and faith upon God whom their parents believe and have taught them to believe too. The main point of the essay is to be equipped to reason the bombarded queries of seekers regarding Christian faith and social issues in the postmodern world. Continue reading Gen-X Apologetics

Shaping Apologetics in a Skeptical Age


Zarathustra Shrugged – What Apologetics should Look Like in a Skeptical Age

Andy Crouch’s essay entitled “Zarathustra Shrugged: What Apologetics should look like in a skeptical age” is a section of his book, “Engaging Unbelief” was originally published in Christianity Today, September 3, 2001 (vol. 45, no.11), p. 101. This is my summarization and critique on his essay.

In the present day of secularism and humanism, Andy Crouch says in his essay, Zarathustra Shrugged that today’s skeptic young generation poses the challenging question to the postmodern era’s apologists. The author Crouch tells us how his friend ended his one-on-one conversation with the young skeptic without any fruition. Despite a hard-fought and well-presented intellectual argument, Crouch’s friend could not win the soul of young man. His skepticism remains firm as it was. His reaction toward the logical argument is the explicit example for shaping the apologetics in a skeptic age.

The main point of the essay is the reflection question of the present skeptical age that if Christianity is worth believing and how apologetics should look like. In his own words, Crouch says that “many people do not ask ‘Is Christianity true?’ but ‘Is it worth believing?’” In the past centuries, evangelicals made every effort to give the reason for the hope they have in Christ Jesus. Every reason of the evangelicals counter-attacked the modern atheist, Bertrand Russell who authored celebrated book ‘Why I am not Christian?’ The counterarguments from Christian apologetics of his time weakened the position of postmodernism and atheism. Continue reading Shaping Apologetics in a Skeptical Age