Tag Archives: Secular Humanism

Friday Phraseology: Secularism


Secularism: A belief system, attitude or style of life that denies or ignores the reality of God. Derived from a term that means “worldly,” secularism (and its articulate philosophical expression, secular humanism) focuses on the natural order of things as the only reality. Increasingly, however, secularism can be viewed as an attitude that even affects people who claim to believe in God and the supernatural. Much in modern culture pressures people to live in such a way that God is marginal and insignificant to their daily existence. See also humanism.


 

Evans, C. Stephen (2010-03-17). Pocket Dictionary of Apologetics & Philosophy of Religion: 300 Terms & Thinkers Clearly & Concisely Defined (The IVP Pocket Reference Series) (Kindle Locations 1587-1591). InterVarsity Press. Kindle Edition.

Sabbatum Excerpt: Adam and Eve, the First Self-Declared Humanists


In Genesis 3 we hear the insolent suggestion by Satan that God has no right to make statements about truth or morality: “Has God indeed said?” The sequel to this question shows that its goal was to undermine the confidence of the first human pair that anything certain could be known about God or His word. For that matter the entire universe could be a projection of one’s own state of mind – a universe as he or she wanted it to be! And this was precisely the option Adam and Eve chose: “You will be like God.” Man would henceforth “create” his own reality according to his own desire and conception. So Adam and Eve were the first self-declared humanists. The self-existent God would no longer be permitted to interfere in the affairs of a secular man. Consequently, god-less man has been miserable in the real world that was designed by its Creator for a society that loved God and kept His commandments.

Kenneth Boa, Cults, World Religions, and the Occult (SP Publications: Colorado, 1990), p. 246

Gen-X Apologetics


Journal Article Review on Gen-X Apologetics by David Neff

In his essay, “Gen-X Apologetics,” David Neff presents three different apologias from three different books. As the adolescents of this generation are highly influenced by rapid social change, global village concept, cultures, and customs, they have undervalued the meaning and purpose of life. Children in their juvenile are highly shaped by their contemporary cohort and culture than intimate family. And they have lost their hope and faith upon God whom their parents believe and have taught them to believe too. The main point of the essay is to be equipped to reason the bombarded queries of seekers regarding Christian faith and social issues in the postmodern world. Continue reading Gen-X Apologetics