Tag Archives: Religion and Spirituality

Quote: Oswald Sanders on Love God with Mind


The flame of our love for God and our fellow men must be fed by fuel provided by the mind. Our love for and worship of God must not be merely intuitive. We must put intelligence into it. Paul says, “I shall pray with the spirit and I shall pray with the mind also” (1 Corinthians 14:15).


J. Oswald Sanders, Enjoying Intimacy with God (Grand Rapids, MI: Discovery House Books, 2000), 90.

Biblical Nuggets: The Belt of Truth – An Armor of God


Armor of God

In his Epistle to the church in Ephesus, Apostle Paul exhorts the church to be fully armored with spiritual weapons to fight spiritual battle with satan everyday (Ephesians 6:10-20). Belt is one of the armors believers are must to have. The belt of Truth must be girded around the waist because a soldier cannot secure his sword without a belt. There will be no place to put his sword around his waist (6:14a). In the Roman world, even when a soldier is not carrying all other weapons, he must be girded with his belt readily. So do believers have to have this belt of Truth in all circumstances.

What is truth?

“Sanctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth.” John 17:17


 

Picture source:

Lexham Press. Logos Bible Software Infographics. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2009.

Free e-Book Giveaways: Cold-Case Christianity by Jim Wallace


Davic C. Cook Books is giving away the Cold-Case Christianity by Jim Wallace. He was a former L.A. County homicide detective and former atheist who embarks in a journey to disapprove Christianity. In his investigative journey, he uses the same skills and strategies to resolve the criminal investigation of the the cold cases. All his investigative findings and evidences lead him to abandon his atheism and believe the gospel accounts of Jesus Christ. Continue reading Free e-Book Giveaways: Cold-Case Christianity by Jim Wallace

Exegetical and Theological Issues: Mark 4:10-12


10 As soon as He was alone, His followers, along with the twelve, began asking Him about the parables. 11 And He was saying to them, “To you has been given the mystery of the kingdom of God, but those who are outside get everything in parables, 12 so that while seeing, they may see and not perceive, and while hearing, they may hear and not understand, otherwise they might return and be forgiven.” (Mark 4:10-12 NASB95)

This text sits awkwardly in its present context. The previous context is about Jesus teaching the crowd in a boat (4:1-2). Without further explanation, Mark shifts the narrative that takes place in private with those around his Twelve disciples (4:10-12), a small group of disciples. Another textual issue that occurs in the passage is the use of plural form of parables, whereas Jesus completes one parable (4:3-9). The placement of the discourse between Jesus and “those around him” also interrupts the sequence of parable. Jesus was still on the boat in the sea (4:1-2), but he and “those around him” appear to be in a private (4:10-12) and the clarification of the parable occurs again in the boat in the sea (4:35-36). At this point, Jesus is again in the public setting with his disciples in the boat. With few exceptions, some scholars believed this passage to be a latter insertion. But this inconsistency is more likely due to tradition, so he decided to leave the setting the way it is now.

Many ascribed the Markan redaction to traditional material. One cannot avoid the questions no matter whether Mark inserted his independent tradition unit or borrowed from the tradition within the parable collection. If he borrowed it from Pre-Markan tradition, where did he find it and what qualified him to apply this text there (4:10-12)? His form, materials within his redaction, and context show that he found it in tradition. Yet there are some questions to be asked. Why did Mark quote Isaiah 6 here? Is the text is about double predestination that only elect or insiders are foreordained to hear the message while outsiders’ ears divinely closed? Some people think that v. 7:17 supports it. But what do we do with 12:12 when outsiders also knew that the parable was about them? As Robert A. Guelich asserts that the text is not about the “double predestination” but about the hardness of heart of those who constantly rejected Jesus and his message.[1]


[1] Guelich, Robert A. Mark 1–8:26. Vol. 34A. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas: Word, Incorporated, 1998.

Biblical Nuggets: Augustinian Hypothesis


Augustinian Hypothesis: The opinion of *Augustine that the current canonical order of the Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John) is the actual chronological order in which they were composed.

Arthur G. Patzia;Anthony J. Petrotta. Pocket Dictionary of Biblical Studies (p. 17). Kindle Edition.