Tag Archives: Creator God

Biblical Nuggets: General Revelation


General Revelation: Term used for the knowledge about God that he makes possible through the natural world, including general religious experiences of awe and dependence. Defenders of general revelation have usually claimed that it is sufficient only to give us knowledge of the existence of a powerful Creator, though some have argued that the goodness of God can also be seen in the natural order. General revelation is distinguished from the *special revelation God has provided on particular occasions in history through prophets, apostles and supremely (for Christians) Jesus of Nazareth. Special revelation provides more concrete knowledge of the character and actions of God in relation to his creation. See also revelation.


Evans, C. Stephen (2010-03-17). Pocket Dictionary of Apologetics & Philosophy of Religion: 300 Terms & Thinkers Clearly & Concisely Defined (The IVP Pocket Reference Series) (p. 49). InterVarsity Press. Kindle Edition.

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John Lennox on Creation of the Universe


What is even more telling, for me as a mathematician, is that Genesis 1 separates God’s creation and organization of the universe into six days, each of which begins with the phrase “And God said …” Now, doubtless this is language that predates modern scientific language, by definition. It would, however, be rather unwise to dismiss it as having nothing significant to say. For the very same emphasis on God speaking that we find in Genesis is also to be found at the beginning of the Gospel of John: “In the beginning was the Word … All things were made through him” (John 1:1,3). John informs us that the physical universe owes its existence to God, who is the Logos. The word logos conveys ideas of “word,” “command,” and “information.”[1]

[1] John C. Lennox, Seven Days that Divide the World: The Beginning According to Genesis and Science (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2011), 141.

Biblical Nuggets: Mars’ Hill in Athens


Mars' Hill in AthensAt Mars’ Hill, also known as the Areopagus, Paul used an inscription to an “unknown god” as a starting point for proclaiming the good news of Christ to the Greek. He confronted widespread idol worship by declaring the true identity of the Creator. Using Greek worship and poetry, Paul articulated God’s demand for repentance and His provision of salvation through Jesus: “Then Paul stood in front of the Areopagus and said… ‘What therefore you worship as unknown, this I proclaim to you'” (Acts 17:22, 23).[1]

Source:

[1] Hubbard, Shiloh, Elliot Ritzema, Corbin Watkins, and Lazarus Wentz with Logos Bible Software and KarBel Media. Faithlife Study Bible Infographics. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012.