Category Archives: Old Testament

Commentary Column: Sons of God and Daughters of Men


Theme Verse of the Week

Now it came about, when men began to multiply on the face of the land, and daughters were born to them, that the sons of God saw that the daughters of men were beautiful; and they took wives for themselves, whomever they chose. (Genesis 6:1-2, NASB95)

MH’s Classic Commentary

For the glory of God’s justice, and as a warning to a wicked world, before the history of the ruin of the old world, we have a full account of its degeneracy, its apostasy from God and rebellion against him. The destroying of it was an act, not of an absolute sovereignty, but of necessary justice, for the maintaining of the honor of God’s government.

Now here we have an account of two things that occasioned the wickedness of the old world. First, mankind increased: Men began to multiply upon the face of the earth. This was the effect of the blessing (Genesis 1:28), and yet man’s corruption so abused and perverted this blessing that it was turned into a curse. Thus, sin takes occasion by the mercies of God to be the more exceedingly sinful. Proverbs 29:16, When the wicked are multiplied, transgression increases. The more sinners the more sin; and the multitude of offenders emboldens men.

Infectious diseases are most destructive in populous cities; and sin is a spreading leprosy. Thus, in the New Testament church, when the number of the disciples was multiplied, there arose a murmuring (Acts 6:1), and we read of a nation that was multiplied, not to the increase of their joy (Isaiah 9:3). Numerous families need to be well-governed, or they could become wicked families.

Second, there were mixed marriages (v. 2): The sons of God (that is, the professors of religion, who were called by the name of the Lord, and called upon that name), married the daughters of men (that is, those who were strangers to God and godliness). The posterity of Seth did not keep by themselves, as they ought to have done, both for the preservation of their own purity and in detestation of the apostasy. They intermingled themselves with the excommunicated race of Cain: They took wives of all that they chose.

But what was wrong in these marriages? (1.) They chose only by their eyes: They saw that they were beautiful, which was all they looked at. (2.) They followed the choice that their own corrupt affections made: they took all that they chose, without advice and consideration. (3.) But that which proved of such bad consequence to them was that they married strange wives and were unequally yoked with unbelievers (2 Corinthians 6:14). This was forbidden to Israel (Deuteronomy 7:3-4). It was the unhappy occasion of Solomon’s apostasy (1 Kings 11:1-4), and was of bad consequence to the Jews after their return out of Babylon (Ezra 9:1-2). Note, Professors of religion, in marrying both themselves and their children, should keep within the bounds of that profession. The bad will sooner ruin the good than the good reform the bad. Those that profess themselves the children of God must not marry without His consent, which they have not if they join in affinity with his enemies.

A Grain of Truth

The biblical principle of unequal yoke is not a big deal for some millennials. The idea seems archaic for them thus no hesitation to flush it in the gutter. If you know anyone who has a nonbeliever partner, please take some time to uphold them in your prayer this week.


(Adapted from Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible: Complete and Unabridged in One Volume. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1994).

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Biblical Nuggets: Ezekiel’s Temple


Ezekiel's Temple
Ezekiel’s Temple

The prophet Ezekiel was shown a vision of the Third Temple in 572 BC, just years after the First Temple was destroyed and before the Second Temple was built. Though the destruction of the Second Temple occurred in AD 70, a third temple has not yet been constructed.

Source:

Hubbard, Shiloh, Elliot Ritzema, Corbin Watkins, and Lazarus Wentz with Logos Bible Software and KarBel Media. Faithlife Study Bible Infographics. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012.

Three Major Themes in the Gospel of Matthew


In the previous post, I mentioned that the Gospel of Matthew has a special Jewish flavor in its contents and characteristics, since it was written especially for Jews in mind. It’s Matthew’s effort to tell the story of Jesus in the backyards and alleys of Jerusalem and the hills and plains of Galilee and beyond that Jesus was the Promised One, a true deliverer – Messiah – who came to establish the Kingdom of God. Let’s review briefly three major themes that run throughout the gospel account here.

1. Jesus is the fulfillment of the Old Testament.

a. Jesus is the fulfillment of prophecy.

Matthew quotes prophet Isaiah (7:14) to point out how Jesus fulfilled the prophecy through virgin birth (Matthew 1:23). Micah 5:2 is fulfilled by being born in Bethlehem. The prophecies in Hosea 11:9, Micah 7:9 were also affirming that Jesus is the fulfillment of the Old Testament prophecies. Isaiah 40:1,2; 52 Psalm 118:12, Zechariah 12:10, and the Suffering Servant in Isaiah 52, all these are testifying Jesus as the Coming Messiah.

b. New Moses

Moses in the Old Testament and Jesus in the New Testament have significant similarities. Both were priests, and teachers of the Laws. Their birth caused uproar and disruption in the society. Moses received the Law in the Sinai, and Jesus gave the Golden Rules (first sermon) in the Mount Olive. Moses is the mediator of the Old Covenant through animal sacrifice, whereas Jesus is the Mediator of the New Covenant through his own blood.

c. Jesus as the King from the line of David.

The genealogy of Jesus clearly shows that he is from the line of David. The significant number of passages in the Scripture tells us that he is from the Davidic line. People in Israel addressed him as the “Son of David” during his earthly ministry (Matthew 12:21; 21:42). Therefore, He is the rightful heir the throne of David.

d. Jesus is the Seed of Abraham

Jesus is attributed as the hope of nations, whereas Abraham is known as the blessings for the nations.

2. God (the Father/King) is the God of both Grace and Judgment

This theme also plays out throughout the book. The Parable of Weeds (13:24-42), the Parable of Talents (25:14-30), and the Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard (20:1-16) show how gracious God is. At the same time, the Parables of the Great Banquet (22:1-14), the passage of the Seven Woes to the Scribes and Pharisees (22-25), and the signs and of the end time and judgement day chapters show how strictly judgmental he is.
3. The Kingdom of God does not Belong to One Particular Ethnic Group.

It is extended to all people from all nations and tribes. Matthew 28:16-20 explicitly talks about people from ends of the earth; the book of Revelation (7:9) also gives us the heavenly glimpse that a great multitude of people beyond our capacity to count come from every nation, and all tribes and people and tongues and worship the Lamb.

Biblical Nuggets: Inscription from Hezekiah’s Tunnel


Hezekiah, king of Judah, fortified Jerusalem at the end of the 8th century BC, just before the invasion of Sennacherib. As part of his building project, Hezekiah brought water into the city of Jerusalem through a tunnel carved from over half a kilometer of bedrock (2 Kings 20:20). A six percent gradient was designed into the excavation to allow water to flow from the Gihon spring into the pool of Siloam (compare John 9:7).

Biblical Nuggets: The Babylonian Chronicles


‎The Babylonian Chronicles are a series of clay tablets inscribed with Babylonian history. They were written at different times, beginning around the sixth century BC. They narrate events beginning in the eighth century BC and cover nearly 500 years of history. Some describe events of biblical history—including Jehoiakim’s refusal to pay tribute (2 Kgs 24:1), Nebuchadnezzar’s siege of Jerusalem (2 Kgs 24:10–11), and Jehoiachin’s capture (2 Kgs 24:12).[1]

[1] Hubbard, Shiloh, Elliot Ritzema, Corbin Watkins, and Lazarus Wentz with Logos Bible Software and KarBel Media. Faithlife Study Bible Infographics. Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2012.