Category Archives: Apologia

Nepal Trip and Holistic Approach to the Needs


AN-Satya

Friends, I just got back from Nepal. I travelled half way around the globe and spent one whole month in Khokana, my birthplace which is also one of the most affected areas by the recent earthquake.  The 7.8 magnitude scale earthquake shook the very foundations in western and central region of Nepal on 25th April 2015.  Waves of aftershock followed by another fresh 7.4 Rector scale quake destroyed other remaining infrastructures in Khokana. The aftershocks of 4-5 magnitude scale are persistently felt almost every day. I was there for a relief work, solely focusing on the community health project. Needs are sky high; generous gifts from people and national/international humanitarian agencies have been helping people with basic needs.

My one month stay was fruitful, in a sense, that I was able to build six permanent toilets for a displaced community of more than 100 people which consists of 27 households living in their temporary shelters in a public property called Bäkhä (pronounced as Baa Khaa). Prior to my arrival there, they had only two makeshift toilets made of only some bamboos and corrugated galvanized zinc roofing sheets. No proper sewage management or privacy. One of them was already knocked down thus unusable.

Basic needs for survival are demanding, as they will be living in the temporary shelters for, at least, next two years. Some of those living in the shelters will never be able to come out and move back to the old resettlement due to poverty. They might end up living in the slum. Yet, these people did not look broken. I saw their will to come out of this situation. I saw their resilience to get up and move on. Meantime, the spirit of dependence on outsiders also was prevalent among other survivors. Those in need had less or nothing, but others who already had were amassing more. Greed, selfishness, dissensions, discord, and jealousy are pervading the once generous hearts.

Sometimes, we easily lose sight  of eternity when something bad happens to people, and we tend to care only about their physical needs. As much as they need help in the midst of this magnitude of calamity, they also need a redeemer who can see them through and through and change their hearts. God has called us to be ambassadors to show his love through our actions. Please pray for the survivors that Christ’s love will be manifested in their lives. And also pray for God’s people who are working to bring the hope of Christ to the displaced people.

Find out more about what’s happening in Khokana.

Friday Phraseology: Theodicy


Theodicy: An answer to the problem of *evil that attempts to “justify the ways of God to man” by explaining God’s reasons for allowing evil. Two of the more important theodicies are the “soul-making theodicy,” which argues that God allows evil so as to make it possible for humans to develop certain desirable virtues, and the “free will theodicy,” which argues that God had to allow for the possibility of evil if he wished to give humans (and angelic beings) *free will. Theodicies are often distinguished from defenses, which argue that it is reasonable to believe that God has reasons for allowing evil even if we do not know what those reasons are.


Evans, C. Stephen (2010-03-17). Pocket Dictionary of Apologetics & Philosophy of Religion: 300 Terms & Thinkers Clearly & Concisely Defined (The IVP Pocket Reference Series) (p. 114). InterVarsity Press. Kindle Edition.

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John Lennox on Creation of the Universe


What is even more telling, for me as a mathematician, is that Genesis 1 separates God’s creation and organization of the universe into six days, each of which begins with the phrase “And God said …” Now, doubtless this is language that predates modern scientific language, by definition. It would, however, be rather unwise to dismiss it as having nothing significant to say. For the very same emphasis on God speaking that we find in Genesis is also to be found at the beginning of the Gospel of John: “In the beginning was the Word … All things were made through him” (John 1:1,3). John informs us that the physical universe owes its existence to God, who is the Logos. The word logos conveys ideas of “word,” “command,” and “information.”[1]

[1] John C. Lennox, Seven Days that Divide the World: The Beginning According to Genesis and Science (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2011), 141.

The Key of Bonding: Dine Together


“And day by day, attending the temple together and breaking bread in their homes, they received their food with glad and generous hearts,…” Acts 2:46 ESV.

“So then, my brothers and sisters, when you gather to eat, you should all eat together.” 1 Corinthians 11:33 NIV

This “eating together” is not unusual for some, especially with friends and coworkers. On the other hand, it is a very big thing for some. In the hustle and bustle of our everyday life, we find it hard to have a meal together with family. People take two or three jobs to provide for their family. In some families, spouses take jobs in two different shifts. Husband taking job at night shift while wife working on second shift allows them to watch kids at home. When was the last time some of you had dinner together with your family? It was most likely the weekends or holidays for some! Dining together is a very special ritual for my family. My parents always expected all four of their children to come eat with them every day. That was something special I still cherish; our conversation, sharing bit and pieces from our everyday life, and planning for things etc., was big part of our family. The Bible also highlights about the significance of eating together. In the ancient Jewish culture, coming to table and eating together was a matter of spirituality. It required them to keep the Old Testament dietary laws and also maintain table etiquette by staying ceremonially clean. Without going into the details of dietary laws of the Bible, let me explain why we should dine together as a family or church small-group.

1) Getting to Know Each other Food or hard liquor, they are somehow more appealing to people and thus bring people closer. We can see how quickly food or drink can turn perfect strangers to connect and relate to each other as if they had known each other for ages. When we invite someone or go with a group to eat together, we talk. Don’t we? As we talk, we also start opening up. That helps us to know about each other. Knowing each other is important to bond in a relationship, thus it fosters warmth and sense of belonging. It also helps a new member of the group connect to the core group members. I see the invitation to the table as a genuine effort to know them personally. Knot

2) Strengthen Communication Communication is vital in every relationship. As we come to eat together, we may talk on wide varieties of topics that interests people in the table once we get to know each other. Everyone in the group can be asked about their input on certain things or simply carry casual conversation. Next, getting to know each other also helps us to open up more and communicate about ones well-being. When we listen to each other or show interest in someone’s story, it demonstrates that the person is valued and his or her ideas or opinions do matter in the group or family. Honest communication can be very meaningful to strengthen the relationship in a family or church small-groups. When we are open to talk, we can express ourselves and accordingly plan things for the best interest of the group. Eating together now means we are not merely communicating ideas in the table but also learning from each other at the same time. This can be a unifying experience for all involved members of the small-group.


| Eating together can be a head start to begin to know someone and garner relationship that is built on trust and carried on by honest communication which promotes sharing with each other.|


3) Strengthen Relationship Eating together can set a tone for carrying out meaningful conversations. Opening up and communicating graciously and honestly builds up each other and overcomes division and rifts if ever existed. It brings healing to the broken hearts, renews and strengthens relationship. Eating together just gives you the sense of intimacy. To have this sense of gratitude and belonging in the group is to have a confidence in members of the small-group. In this sense, we hold each other accountable.

4) Promote Sharing Ministry is a teamwork. Any group that maintains healthy relationship with group members, communicate effectively and in clarity will most likely succeed in the mission or ministry. Sharing requires trust of each other in the group. Without having known each other and bonded with group members, people cannot merely share about their lives, issues, struggles or anything that’s personal. The level of trust in the group determines how much one is ready and open to share. Therefore, the idea of sharing your personal life and struggles with someone certainly requires that you can trust and count on the persons or group you are with. Eating together can be a head start to begin to know someone and garner relationship that is built on trust and carried on by honest communication which promotes sharing with each other. So, be sure to include others, since the Gospel narratives make known of Christ too many times around the table with bread and wine.

Sabbatum Excerpt: Jesus’ Disciples Sincerely Believed Jesus Rose from the Dead and Appeared to Them


Today’s excerpt is related to the resurrection of Jesus. When you refute the resurrection of Jesus Christ, you also have a burden to explain why the disciples who were hiding with fear for their own lives when Jesus was crucified were changed dramatically all of sudden. What made them to come forward with boldness and proclaim that the crucified Jesus had risen from the dead? Why were they ready to suffer and die for their faith? Read this excerpt: Continue reading Sabbatum Excerpt: Jesus’ Disciples Sincerely Believed Jesus Rose from the Dead and Appeared to Them